Ian Bartoszek, 40, from right, Jaimie Kittle, 23, and Ian Easterling, 25, lift a Burmese python into a container after capturing it along a tracking route at the edge of urban Collier Country along US 41 East on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The science department at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida has a team of researchers dedicated to studying, tracking and capturing the Burmese python.

Ian Bartoszek, 40, from right, Jaimie Kittle, 23, and Ian Easterling, 25, lift a Burmese python into a container after capturing it along a tracking route at the edge of urban Collier Country along US 41 East on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The science department at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida has a team of researchers dedicated to studying, tracking and capturing the Burmese python.

 Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, picks off the shedding skin of a captured female Burmese python on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, picks off the shedding skin of a captured female Burmese python on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

 A 15 foot female Burmese python coils around itself inside a container after being captured by a team of researchers from the Conservancy of Southwest Florida on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The team has collected 2,068 pounds of python this season. 

A 15 foot female Burmese python coils around itself inside a container after being captured by a team of researchers from the Conservancy of Southwest Florida on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The team has collected 2,068 pounds of python this season. 

 Ian Easterling, 25, checks on a male Burmese python before releasing it back into the wild along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. "The best python detector on the planet is another Burmese python, specifically a male Burmese python to lead us to the breeding females," says Ian Bartoszek.   

Ian Easterling, 25, checks on a male Burmese python before releasing it back into the wild along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. "The best python detector on the planet is another Burmese python, specifically a male Burmese python to lead us to the breeding females," says Ian Bartoszek. 
 

 Ian Bartoszek, 40, a science coordinator and wildlife biologist with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, looks out the window of a plane while tracking Burmese pythons in Collier County using radio telemetry on Monday, March 27, 2017. Male snakes that the team captures are surgically implanted with a radio transmitter, which allows the team to track them across the landscape.

Ian Bartoszek, 40, a science coordinator and wildlife biologist with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, looks out the window of a plane while tracking Burmese pythons in Collier County using radio telemetry on Monday, March 27, 2017. Male snakes that the team captures are surgically implanted with a radio transmitter, which allows the team to track them across the landscape.

 Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, raises an antenna to monitor Burmese pythons through radio telemetry along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, raises an antenna to monitor Burmese pythons through radio telemetry along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

 Ian Easterling, 25, performs a necropsy on a female Burmese python to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Easterling, 25, performs a necropsy on a female Burmese python to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

 Ian Easterling, 25, pulls back the skin of a female Burmese python during a necropsy to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Easterling, 25, pulls back the skin of a female Burmese python during a necropsy to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

 Ian Bartoszek, 40, from right, Jaimie Kittle, 23, and Ian Easterling, 25, lift a Burmese python into a container after capturing it along a tracking route at the edge of urban Collier Country along US 41 East on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The science department at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida has a team of researchers dedicated to studying, tracking and capturing the Burmese python.
 Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, picks off the shedding skin of a captured female Burmese python on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 
 A 15 foot female Burmese python coils around itself inside a container after being captured by a team of researchers from the Conservancy of Southwest Florida on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The team has collected 2,068 pounds of python this season. 
 Ian Easterling, 25, checks on a male Burmese python before releasing it back into the wild along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. "The best python detector on the planet is another Burmese python, specifically a male Burmese python to lead us to the breeding females," says Ian Bartoszek.   
 Ian Bartoszek, 40, a science coordinator and wildlife biologist with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, looks out the window of a plane while tracking Burmese pythons in Collier County using radio telemetry on Monday, March 27, 2017. Male snakes that the team captures are surgically implanted with a radio transmitter, which allows the team to track them across the landscape.
 Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, raises an antenna to monitor Burmese pythons through radio telemetry along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 
 Ian Easterling, 25, performs a necropsy on a female Burmese python to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 
 Ian Easterling, 25, pulls back the skin of a female Burmese python during a necropsy to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Bartoszek, 40, from right, Jaimie Kittle, 23, and Ian Easterling, 25, lift a Burmese python into a container after capturing it along a tracking route at the edge of urban Collier Country along US 41 East on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The science department at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida has a team of researchers dedicated to studying, tracking and capturing the Burmese python.

Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, picks off the shedding skin of a captured female Burmese python on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

A 15 foot female Burmese python coils around itself inside a container after being captured by a team of researchers from the Conservancy of Southwest Florida on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. The team has collected 2,068 pounds of python this season. 

Ian Easterling, 25, checks on a male Burmese python before releasing it back into the wild along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. "The best python detector on the planet is another Burmese python, specifically a male Burmese python to lead us to the breeding females," says Ian Bartoszek. 
 

Ian Bartoszek, 40, a science coordinator and wildlife biologist with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, looks out the window of a plane while tracking Burmese pythons in Collier County using radio telemetry on Monday, March 27, 2017. Male snakes that the team captures are surgically implanted with a radio transmitter, which allows the team to track them across the landscape.

Ian Easterling, 25, a conservation associate with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, raises an antenna to monitor Burmese pythons through radio telemetry along the edge of urban Collier Country on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Easterling, 25, performs a necropsy on a female Burmese python to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

Ian Easterling, 25, pulls back the skin of a female Burmese python during a necropsy to collect samples and count eggs at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida lab on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

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